Category Archives: Objects

3040Z CNC Router

Complete 3040Z CNC System

I’ve been fascinated with machine tools and mechatronics for well over a decade, and have been indulging that fascination with a series of little benchtop CNC machines since about 2008, especially since my collection of related degrees lend legitimacy to my desires. Because of my other lifestyle choices I’m more or less restricted to a machine which is small and well-behaved enough to operate in an apartment, is roughly man-portable, and fits in normal vehicles, at least for the time being. Possibly fortunately, this restricts me from going off the deep end and buying a small VMC, or even building out the heavier classes of benchtop machine.

Last year I started to feel like my old V1 Shapeoko (ca. 2012) was not really usable as a machine tool – it was a good toy, and I learned a ton of cool things from it, but it wasn’t stiff enough, reliable enough, or laid out in a way that made it practical to use for much of anything. After I had my Shapeoko on campus for a demo day, my adviser was inspired to buy himself a complete package Chinese 3040 CNC router, and I got a chance to play with that for a few days. I wasn’t terribly impressed with the electronics on it, but the frame proper impressed me enough that I decided I wanted one as an upgrade.

…So near the end of the spring semester, I ordered myself a bare 3040Z frame and a pile of parts to kit it out. The machine is built almost entirely from inexpensive Chinese components, purchased via a mixture of Aliexpress, eBay, and Amazon sellers (I’ve become fond of uxcell for small parts). I don’t have accurate or current price quotes for the whole thing because I bought as I went, and various parts are reused from previous projects. I suspect the total is in the neighborhood of $1200 – comparable to buying a slightly more powerful finished system without the enclosure or limit switches.

It was my intention to write this up in sections as I built it out, but kept opting to play with work on the machine instead of doing more writing – particularly since such a large part of the things I’m supposed to be doing with my time of late are also writing. I finally got the last of the major parts “done” to my satisfaction a few weeks ago, so it’s time to gather the pictures and notes from what should have been half a dozen topic posts and make a gigantic brain-dump.

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Posted in Computers, DIY, Electronics, General, Objects | Tagged | 4 Comments

G|Bomb Push|Pump

gbombboardbtm

I finally bought a G|Bomb Push|Pump setup after years of teasing myself about buying a proper hybrid distance deck. I selected it over the only other obvious contender, the Subsonic Century, mostly because as an engineer the G|Bomb design tickles me. Yes, it’s a $300 deck with another ~$100 of parts on it, but based on my first few rides, it’s totally worth it.
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Posted in Entertainment, General, Objects | 3 Comments

Makergear M2 Upgrades

M2UpgradeComplete

The lab Makergear M2’s heated bed power supply died a few weeks ago, so we decided it was time for a serious upgrade, and set out to equip it with basically the best parts currently on the market, as we’re convinced the M2’s mechanical construction is still about as good as it gets.

Our M2 was a very early M2 from early 2013, with a split-voltage 19v/12v power supply setup, was on its second RAMBo after the first one melted around some connectors (high-current 12V is not a good idea), and RAMBo #2 was already abused with an external transistor on a heatsink wired in to the bed heater. It was also on its second hotend after the first one failed catastrophically during a sensor-separation incident some years ago, and was running a mutant Makergear V3b w/ 12V cartridge custom ordered to suit our machine.

So, shopping list:

Plus a whole boatload of connectors. For reasons known only to themselves, Panucatt doesn’t (or at least didn’t at the time) actually document which kind(s) of connectors are on the board, or offer a wiring kit. Some measurement and educated dead-reckoning got us there, so for anyone else looking, it uses Molex KK connectors in 2.54mm with both keys and locking ramp, in 2,3,and 4 positions. Specifically:

  • Motor (4x): 4 position, Molex p/n:0022013047 (Digikey)
  • Endstops/Probes (4x): 3 position, Molex p/n:0022013037 (Digikey)
  • Thermistors (2x): 2 position, Molex p/n:0008500114 (Digikey)
  • Crimp pins for the above (>32x): Molex p/n:0008500114 (Digikey)
  • Fan (2x): Standard 100mil pinheader, 3 positions. We used generic 3pos Dupont connectors from a Chinese kit.

I’d suggest buying at least one extra housing in each size, and a substantial number of extra crimp pins (They’re like a dime each in quantity, we bought 50 and had plenty to spare). I got a bit of a chuckle that they use 2.54mm molex KKs with locks and keys for everything except the fans, while standard PC fans use 3p molex KKs with locks and keys, but we’re running a 24V system so PC fans would be inappropriate anyway. I personally bought myself an Engineer PA-09 crimp tool because this crossed the line on crimp terminal projects where I’m willing to do it by futzing around with pliers.

M2PartsPile

The parts for this little project could have bought us a second low end printer, but that wouldn’t have given us any interesting new capabilities (particularly since we already have a Wanhao i3), and the machine we ended up with is approximately as capable as any FDM printer on the market.

The Makergear specialty parts are lovely, and improved in various ways as compared to even the newer M2 the lab PI owns personally; the power supply is in a ridiculously nice metal case and has ferrule-tipped color coded wires, the new bed heater covers the aluminum spreader more fully, is constructed with a very nicely machined wire and thermistor bracket, and includes a semi-rigid split-loom to keep it clear. I built a couple slightly weird cables and did some aggressive polish and longevity tweaks, including putting ferrules on everything going into a screw terminal (I did it partially because I decided I wanted an excuse to own a ferrule crimper and assortment). Probably the weirdest bit is that all the fans have male 2pos Dupont connectors on them, and the always-on cooling fans around the head are connected via a Y cable that terminates in a 4-position female dupont wired +24,Gnd,+24,Gnd (Picture has the wires routed wrong).
M2FanFork

All the cabling then retreated into the awesome mesh split-loom wire guides Makergear uses, and went on in more or less in the same configuration as the original cabling, including the weird little ball of wire at the back of the frame.

M2InitalElectronics

We also printed a number of parts for the upgrade, including a set of thingiverse user Neo Usagi’s E3D v6 40 mm Fan Duct and Extruder for MakerGear M2, which is an excellent design, though ours came out seriously over-tight and had to do a bit of grinding then perform the install with a vise – the dominant theory is that it was our fault for using 3 walls. Once fitted, it’s proven to be an excellent assembly with very good well-focused airflow and no tendency to bump into parts or the machine. The area around the head in this setup is extremely congested, and you must run the hot-end wires to the X+ side (the same side as the fan shroud mount) or they will hit the frame before the X endstop triggers, but once everything is situated it makes a nice package with no dangly bits. Even though it isn’t showing much noticeable difference in performance relative to late-model Makergear heads, I’m thoroughly impressed with the E3D hotend; the machining, the quality of the accessories in the kit, the efficacy of the heatbreak, the ease of assembly, everything is excellent, and in the mount we used, it only eats about 3mm of Z travel. They richly deserve their reputation.

M2E3DAssembly

As for the X5 Mini, two of the Makergear original mounting holes are close enough (though not perfectly aligned) to mount the board in a reasonable way with a pair of standard brass threaded standoffs, and a pair of those little barbed plastic motherboard standoffs trimmed to size to prevent tilting, all taken from the lab’s vast collection of PC assembly hardware. Leaving it exposed didn’t seem like a good plan, and we were seeing a slightly uncomfortable amount of warming on the motor drivers, so it needed a case and fan shroud. To that end we designed our own cover/enclosure/fan duct/bracket for the X5 Mini V3 and Viki2 (visible in the header picture – it has a 24V 40mm fan facing the Z motor blowing into the case, powered directly from an extra pair of PSU taps), a more detailed post about which will probably appear on profhankd’s thingiverse page shortly. We did all the printed components for the upgrade in our new favorite material, MakerGeeks’ “Raptor” PLA, incidentally in blue.

Software-wise, I’m satisfied but not enthused by Smoothieware. We’re now running this config.txt, which assumes 32x microstepping on all axes and produces very smooth, quiet motion with a minimum of idle heating. The major tuning efforts are just in the heater PIDs and on the Z movement, as the M2 design tends to make terrible noises if the Z movement is outside of a very narrow velocity window.

I wanted to like Smoothieware a lot more, and it is working well enough for the most part, but it is frankly kind of a garbage fire once you start looking at the code. It’s “modular,” but in an entirely ad-hoc way, so the parts don’t interact in entirely reasonable ways (Ex: AFIK it is currently incapable of setting up a “prevent cold extrusion” behavior, and would take pretty substantial changes to make it able to), with random parser fragments spread throughout the code. It also fails silently on unknown configuration keys, so I wasted the better part of a day on the extruder not responding after I wrote extruder.head.module_enable instead of extruder.head.enable because I misunderstood their half-updated documentation from when they hacked it to support multiple extruders. It looks and smells like a Reprappy hacker/hobbyst “move fast and break things” software, which is fine, but is so much so that I really don’t have high hopes for it maturing into something survivable without a complete redesign. This does make me feel better about sticking with LinuxCNC for my latest personal CNC project (Which I will eventually get to writing up and posting…).

Is ridiculously quieter than even the 24V stock M2, prints nicely at 150mm/s in PLA, heats up almost as fast as you can get a file loaded up and sliced, and can do so more or less independent and minimally attended. From a working current-gen 24v M2, none of the changes we made are particularly substantial upgrades, but from it’s state before the improvement is spectacular.

Posted in DIY, Electronics, General, Objects, School | 4 Comments

TP-Link Archer C7 with OpenWRT

I bought myself a TP-Link Archer C7 because the 2.4Ghz congestion in my apartment has become so terrible that my good old TP-Link WR1043ND (no 5Ghz radios) is no longer adequate, and the C7 was very well spoken of among reasonably-priced 802.11ac routers. It also has some nice perks like two on-board USB ports, so I can use it as a print server (with p910nd) and have USB storage for logs (vnstat & co.) and such attached without a separate hub. I wasn’t feeling quite motivated enough to buy and set up one of the NUC-like cheap SFF Intel boxes as a router like Ars Technica and Jeff Atwood have recently noted is an increasingly good plan, based largely on the dearth of ac WiFi cards that work reliably in host mode.

Some notes that may be of use to others, particularly about firmware replacement on recent models and throughput:
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Posted in Computers, Electronics, General, Objects | 14 Comments

Clevo P650SE/NP8651

P650SET510Flat_web

My 5-year-old T510 has been showing its age, mostly by falling apart (speakers died, parts held on with gaffers tape, occasional probably-thermal GPU lockups, etc.) and I decided it was time for a replacement. Unfortunately, the laptop market right now has absolutely nothing appealing (clickpads everywhere!) so I gave up and bought a closest-match Clevo P650SE chassis that I could kit out myself. There are a couple annoyances, but overall it’s a nice machine. Really long detail notes including a bunch of Linux tweaking below.

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RFID Exploration

I recently picked up a USB RFID reader/writer pod to play with, partly to learn enough to be dangerous about the tech, and partly hoping to tamper with the RFIDs in the current university ID cards. I’m pretty sure I failed on the latter point, but am succeeding at the former in the process.

RFIDKit

Notes from the first round of fiddling with it follow.

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Galaxy S5

MyTouch 4G Slide vs. SGS5, flat dimensions.

MyTouch 4G Slide vs. SGS5, flat dimensions.

I got a Samsung Galaxy S5 (The T-Mobile flavor, SM-900T) a week ago. I’m pretty pleased with it overall, but many of the impressions worth sharing are not positive, particularly of the small-but-stupid variety. Much of the animus (and credit) is really for Google, not Samsung.
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New Chorder

I’ve been playing with chorded input devices for years, and got the itch again recently.

CNChorder
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3D Printing KC Talk

I gave a quick primer on 3D printing as a Keeping Current (CS departmental) seminar yesterday.

It’s not a great standalone deck but posted (in reduced quality, gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 -dPDFSETTINGS=/ebook -dNOPAUSE -dQUIET -dBATCH -sOutputFile=/path/to/output.pdf /path/to/input.pdf is good magic).

It seemed to be well-received, printed objects were played with, thoughtful questions were asked, I think this is the first time I’ve given a 3D printing primer to a wider group and not been asked the “guns” question.

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Lab Fridge Repair: Thinking with 3D Printing

I’m posting this because it’s such a nice example for the standard “What are 3D printers really good for?” question.

When I got to the lab today, I was told the can chute in our mini-fridge was broken. Inspection showed that too many of the little plastic inserts/bushings that retain the bars were missing and/or broken. This is a years-old cheap GE minifridge, so it isn’t even worth looking for OEM replacements.

Now we get to the “Thinking with 3D printing” part: I plucked one of the remaining ones, went over it with some calipers, transferred the measurements into OpenSCAD, and printed one off to test fit. The ID was a little tight, so I adjusted the model, printed 6 more, and fixed the problem.

In case the model is useful for anyone else: OpenSCAD and STL.

Important Details:

  • This took like an hour from start to finish, and wasn’t the only thing I was doing at the time. The printing itself was around 1 minute per insert.
  • The new inserts are better than the originals. Not quite as pretty in some ways (though they are blue and glow-in-the-dark, because that’s our current junk filament), but the fit is considerably better.
  • That “iterate” step in the middle, where you just try it and adjust if needed is among the most beautiful things about 3D printers.
Posted in DIY, General, Objects, School | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments